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“For God is not a God of confusion but of peace.” 1 Corinthians 14:33a

RandomThis passage is one I enjoy because it sorts out so much. Paul writes it in the midst of a discourse on spiritual gifts. The difference is that this statement is the proof to that which passed before it. God is a God of peace and order so the worship of God should also be peaceful and orderly. When doing an exposition of the passage we note the context, always. But this statement is not dependent on the context. We know this because Paul uses it as a proof. A proof cannot be dependent on what it proves.

Peace, here, is used in contrast to confusion. The Greek word translated confusion also carries the meanings of tumult and unquietness. God is orderly, not confused or disorderly.

This is in direct opposition to evolution’s theory of the more complex growing out of the less complex by way of random change. This is simply not the way God works. God is a God of peace, not tumult, not confusion, not randomness but order.

Yet evolution is what our children learn. Many schools, whether out of good will or ill, teach evolution. Then our children return home and act “randomly”, seek the “random”, even praise the “random” (“that’s so random”, “he’s so random”). Should we be surprised? Through their entire day the random-god is praised. Review the current cartoons and websites (www.homestarrunner.com). I was helping with the church’s youth group one Sunday and overheard normal girl chat about this guy and that guy. What caught my attention was that one guy was described as “so funny” because “he’s so random”. Now, don’t get me wrong, the unexpected can be funny but the nonsensical and purposeless lacks humor.

So when we continue to accept and endorse teachings like evolution and fail to teach the Christian God of order, we should not be surprised that our children imitate the god they know.